Heart disease and women


People often do not consider heart disease a woman's disease. Yet cardiovascular disease is the leading killer of women over age 25. It kills nearly twice as many women in the United States as all types of cancer.

Men have a greater risk for heart disease earlier in life than women. Women's risk increases after menopause.


Women may have warning signs that go unnoticed for weeks or even years before a heart attack occurs.


Recognizing and treating a heart attack right away improves your chance for survival. On average, a person having a heart attack will wait for 2 hours before calling for help.

Know the warning signs and always call 911 within 5 minutes of when symptoms begin. By acting quickly, you can limit damage to your heart.


A risk factor is something that increases your chance of getting a disease or having a certain health condition. You can change some risk factors for heart disease. Other risk factors you cannot change.

Women should work with their health care provider to address risk factors they can change.

Estrogen is no longer used to prevent heart disease in women of any age. Estrogen may increase the risk of heart disease for older women. However, it may still be used for some women to treat hot flashes or other medical problems.

Some women can take a low-dose aspirin daily to help prevent heart attacks and stroke. Aspirin can increase the risk for bleeding, so check with your health care provider before beginning daily aspirin treatment.


Some of the risk factors for heart disease that you CAN change are:

If you drink alcohol, limit yourself to no more than one drink per day. DO NOT drink just for the purpose of protecting your heart.

Good nutrition is important to your heart health, and it will help control some of your heart disease risk factors.


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